Training, Safety and Recruitment/Department Development 

Classroom Style Training
Hands-on Training
Instructional Training

​Training in the Department



The Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue is steeped in traditions and honors.  When a person from the fire service from near and far hears a person if from the KDFR Family, they automatically think of highly trained, highly professional, and well knowledgeable personnel.  
We here at the Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue pride ourselves on staying current with the latest technology and firefighting techniques to provide state of the art fire protection to our citizens, businesses, guests, and visitors throughout our city.  

The Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue Training Division ensures that each and every Firefighter within our organization right up to the Administration Staff and Fire Chief receives well over the standards of the North Carolina State requirements of one hundred ninety-two hours in Company Level Training, well over two hundred forty hours of Recruit/New Firefighter Training for the new employees of the department within their first year of being an employee with the Department, well over sixty hours of New Driver's Training for the first year of the new Back-up Drivers, well over the twelve hours of Existing Driver/Operator Training for the Regular Drivers, and well over twelve hours of Officer Training for the Captains and Administration Staff annually.

The Training Division logs in over twelve thousand to sixteen thousand hours of various training's totaled by the entire staff throughout the average year.

Safety in the Department



It is up to each and every Firefighter within our great organization to ensure that each man/woman goes home at the end of the shift.  Safety is a main component to achieve this goal.  Firefighting is one of the top ten most dangerous jobs in the world, so it goes without saying that the Firefighting industry must maintain steps to keep their employees as safe as possible.  Enter the Safety Officer.  

The Fire Safety Officer must be equipped with the latest equipment and knowledge of how to be vigilant at every turn within the organization.  This is on the Incident and even in the Station during routine maintenance.  The Safety Officer must teach him/herself how to see beyond what is happening right then and take a quick sample snapshot into the future.  Always scanning the situation looking for unsafe conditions and actions that could cause an injury or worse.

The Safety Officer has a direct interaction with creating and maintaining the Training Safety Manual for the Department.  He/She is to ensure that the most current practices are being used within the Department on the incident scene and in the station. 
Station Safety Checks
Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue Maltese Cross

Recruitment in the Department



For a Department to continue on with traditions and honors, the Department must always be planning for the future and continue to receive highly trainable and knowledgeable people.  In order to do this the Department must have good standards in place and techniques to find the most qualified candidates to become future Firefighters within our Organization.   

To become a Firefighter for the Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue, one must have the following qualifications in order to apply:

  1. You must be at least 19 years old to be a Firefighter for the Kinston Department of Fire & Rescue.  
  2. High School Diploma, High School Equivalency, or have your GED
  3. Valid North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicle Operators License (NCOL) with the ability to obtain a Class B NCOL within the first year of employment.
  4. A FULLY completed on-line application filed with the City of Kinston Human Resources (Click on Web Address below to access an application, create an account and sign in)
  5. Ability to complete and Pass the Fitness Entry Aptitude Test (FEAT)
  6. Pass the Interview Process of the Administration of the Kinston Department of Fire & Rescue
  7. A Good Clear Background Check from your most recent County/City of Residence (excluding minor motor vehicle infractions)
The following Training Qualifications are encouraged: 
(NOTE:  Some applicants may qualify, depending on the need and demand, to be sent to a North Carolina Certified Fire Academy as a condition of Employment)

  1. The Old North Carolina State Firefighter Level I, or Level I and II, or the new standard  (January 2015) North Carolina State Firefighters Certification
  2. Hazardous Materials Operations Level I
  3. North Carolina Medical Responder Certification within the first year of employment  (North Carolina Emergency Medical Technician B Preferred)
The Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue has taken great strides and is continuing to develop the best Fitness Entry Aptitude Test (FEAT).  The FEAT is designed to measure in a snapshot glimpse amount of time, the physical abilities of the candidate and simulates the Fire-ground actions that a Firefighter may encounter while performing their duties on an incident.  The FEAT is a hybrid version of the most common Fire Course known as the Candidate Physical Ability Test (CPAT) which was created in 1997 by the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF) which put together a Task Force Team of various major city fire departments from across the United States and developed eight important, basic procedures of physical activity on the fire-grounds.  These are considered minimal requirements of physical activity at an average incident scene, and if the Firefighter candidate can not pass these functions they are considered to be unfit to be able to be a Firefighter. 

The Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue has developed a course that consists of the following to assess our Firefighter Candidates:

The Fire Candidates will be requested to arrive to the Department's FEAT Training Sessions and Mandatory Meeting. We provide three days for training and the third day is the Mandatory Meeting.  The fourth day is the actual FEAT.  During the Training Sessions each Fire Candidate will be expected to try each and every station within the course (not in chronological order) and must attend at least two of the three days (all three days are preferred).  The stations will be monitored by Proctors and the Fire Candidates will be checked off knowing that each Fire Candidate received the proper training on how to negotiate the station.  During the Mandatory Meeting each Fire Candidate will have to negotiate the one hundred ten foot aerial climb.  The Fire Candidate will be timed during the climb and must pass this station to participate in the FEAT the next day.

How this station is negotiated:

The Fire Candidate will put on a fitting ladder belt and climb up to the platform of the aerial wearing a helmet and work gloves.  The time for the Fire Candidate will start when the Candidate grabs onto the ladder to start the ascent.  The Fire Candidate will ascend to the top of the aerial ladder, clip in at the TOP RUNG of the ladder, lean back, throwing both arms out parallel to the deck then back in, un-clip and descend.  The Proctor will monitor the entire process.  The Fire Candidate can not touch the rails of the ladder for use in climbing, nor use the cables within the ladder.  If the Candidate touches them for use in climbing the ladder the Fire Candidate fails the station.  If the Fire Candidate stops for more than three seconds during the ascent or descent on the ladder.  If the Candidate stops the Proctor will warn the Candidate and will add five seconds to the time of the Candidate each stop.  The Candidate can only stop two times during the entire climb.  If there is a third stop of more than three seconds the Candidate will fail the station.


The FEAT:

The Fire Candidate wears a Fire Helmet, Work Gloves and has a fifty pound weighted vest placed onto them to simulate the Firefighting equipment worn during incident operations and stands behind the starting line provided by the Department.  The Candidate is timed during the FEAT.  The end time is factored into a ranking system for the Candidates during their Interview Meeting.   

1.Fire Hydrant Connection and Water Supply Mitigation

Fire Hydrant Connection - Water Mitigation

Theory Behind the Fire Hydrant Connection and Water Supply Mitigation:

The Fire Hydrant Connection is the very first responsibility taught to the New Firefighter Employee within the Department.   It is also crucial to the entire Fire Operation during a Fire because this brings the water supply to the truck, which is essential protection to the Firefighters and incident success.   

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate wearing the fifty pound weighted vest steps over the starting line thus starting the entire FEAT.  The Candidate retrieves the coupling attached to the twenty-five foot section of five inch water supply line and drags it to the fire hydrant and removes the four inch steamer cap (center steamer cap).  The Candidate connects the coupling to the to the threads of the fire hydrant and ensures the connection is tight.  The Candidate walks around the fire hydrant and STANDS AT THE BACK OF THE FIRE HYDRANT.  The Candidate places the spanner wrench onto the top of the fire hydrant and turns the valve EIGHTEEN times COUNTER CLOCKWISE.  The Proctor counts off loudly.  The Proctor only counts the turns as long as the Candidate is turning in a counter clockwise motion.  If the Candidate stands anywhere near either of the two and a half side caps of the fire hydrant or in front of the fire hydrant, while attempting to turn the water supply, the Candidate fails the station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached the eighteen turns counter clockwise.  The Candidate will go to the next station.

2. Stair Climb SimulationStair Step Simulation

Theory Behind the Stair Climb Simulation:

 The Stair Climb Simulation is designed to stimulate the Fire Candidate's heart and place the same stresses on the Candidate as if climbing stairs during an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the step block continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest.  A Metronome set at a 2/4 time measure with 120 beats per minute setting is running to assist the Candidate keep in step and time.  As the Candidate steps onto the step block, a three minute time period begins counting down.  The Candidate must stay in step with the metronome's rhythm and beat for the entire three minute period of time, stepping up and up with both feet, then down and down with both feet.  If the Candidate slows down below the count the Proctor warns the Candidate.  This can only happen twice within the three minute period.  If the Proctor has to warn the Candidate a third time the Candidate fails this station.  If the Candidate steps outside of the box area while stepping down, the Proctor warns the Candidate.  This can only happen once within the evolution.  If the Candidate steps outside of the box area a second time the Candidate will fail this station.  The Time Keeper will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached the end of the three minute period.  The Candidate will go to the next station.

3. 2 1/2 inch Dry Hose Deployment and ManeuveringHose DragHose Drag CornerHose Pull Box

Theory Behind the 2 1/2 inch Dry Hose Deployment and Maneuvering:

The 2 1/2 inch Dry Hose Deployment and Maneuvering is designed to test the Fire Candidate's strength by placing stresses on the Candidate as they deploy hoses and maneuver them into position during an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the nozzle continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest. The Candidate places the nozzle and hose over their shoulder and grabs up to the blue line marked on the hose.  The Candidate then runs to the corner drill, into the corridor, ninety degrees left and to the hose pulling box.  The Candidate takes a knee within the box and pulls the hose to the marked coupling passes the line.  At least one of the Candidate's knees must be touching the deck at all times.  If the Candidate's knee comes off of the deck, the Proctor warns the Candidate.  This can only happen once within the evolution.  If the Candidate's knee comes off of the deck a second time the Candidate fails this station.  If the Candidate is anywhere out of the box area the Proctor warns the Candidate.  This can only happen once within the evolution.  If the Proctor has to warn the Candidate a second time the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached the marked coupling passing the line.  The Candidate will go to the next station.

4. Tool/Equipment Transport/Handling

Equipment Haul Starting PointFifty Foot turn point for Equipment Haul


Theory Behind the Tool/Equipment Transport/Handling:

The Tool/Equipment Transport/Handling is designed to test the Fire Candidate's dexterity and ability to follow directions by taking them off of the truck and transporting them into position during an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the simulated Fire Apparatus continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest. The Candidate grabs the first chainsaw by the handle and the protective stabilizer handle above the machine and lowers it from the simulated Fire Apparatus to the deck at the Candidate's feet and repeats the steps again for the second chainsaw on the opposite side.  The Candidate then picks both chainsaws up, turns to the course and walks the saws around the fifty foot marker cone back to the simulated Fire Apparatus.  The Candidate reverses the steps by placing both chainsaws on the deck. Then picking up the first chainsaw by using the handle and protective stabilizer handle across the top of the machine, and place the chainsaw back onto the simulated Fire Apparatus.  Picking up the second chainsaw and the same way and placing the chainsaw back onto the simulated Fire Apparatus.  If the Candidate at anytime grabs either of the chainsaws by the chainsaw bar the Candidate fails this station.  If the Candidate does not place the chainsaws on the deck taking down the chainsaws from the simulated Fire Apparatus or does not place both of the chainsaws on the deck prior to returning the chainsaws to the simulated Fire Apparatus, the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has placed the second chainsaw back onto the simulated Fire Apparatus.  The Candidate will go to the next station.



5. Forcible Entry/Ventilation Drill


Forcible Entry/Vertical Roof Ventilation Simulation

Theory Behind the Forcible Entry/Ventilation Drill:

The Forcible Entry/Ventilation Drill is designed to place the same stresses on the Candidate as if climbing on a pitched roof and cutting a vertical ventilation hole in an incident.  It also simulates forcing entry into doors/windows by the motions of swinging the eight pound sledgehammer multiple times to gain access into a building during an incident.

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the simulated roof continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest.  The Candidate grabs the sledge hammer as they ascend onto the simulated roof, and swings the sledgehammer twenty-five times over the Candidate's shoulder and striking the strike-plate provided at the top-ridge of the simulator. If the Candidate does not go over the shoulder on the up swing the Proctor warns the Candidate and the Proctor does not count the strike on the strike-plate.  If the Candidate has to be warned three times that the sledgehammer did not pass the shoulder the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will count out loud and will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached their twenty-fifth strike on the strike-plate.   The Candidate will go to the next station.

6. Rescue DragRescue DragFifty foot turn point for both the Rescue Drag ( front cone) Tool Equipment Haul (back cone)


Theory Behind the Rescue Drag:

The Rescue Drag is designed to see if the Candidate has the ability to drag a downed Firefighter/Rescued Civilian to safety during an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the the Rescue Manikin continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest.  The Candidate grabs the straps provided around the Rescue Manikin and drags the manikin around the fifty foot marker and back across the line.  The Rescue Manikin cannot touch or knock over the marker at the fifty foot mark.  If the Rescue Manikin touches the marker the Candidate is add five seconds from the Candidate's time.  If the marker is knocked completely over the Candidate fails this station.  If the Candidate stops for more than three seconds, the Proctor warns the Candidate and adds five seconds each stop.  This can only happen twice within the evolution.  If the Proctor has to warn the Candidate a third time the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has the feet of the Rescue Manikin over the line.  The Candidate will go to the next station.

7. Ladder Raise and Lowering 

Ladder Raise


Theory Behind the Ladder Raise and Lowering:

The Ladder Raise and Lowering is designed to place the same stresses on the Candidate as they raise and lower ladders during an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Fire Candidate approaches the ladders continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest.  A fourteen foot combination roof ladder is laying on the deck.  The Candidate reaches down picks up the ladder and hand over hand touches each rung while walking forward pushing the ladder up into the vertical position.  The Candidate then lowers the ladder back down to the deck touching each rung while stepping backwards lowering the ladder and lays the ladder back down onto the deck.  The Candidate immediately goes over to the twenty-four foot extension ladder, stands in the box, grabs onto the lanyard of the ladder and pulls hand over hand on the rope fully extending the ladder upward.  The Candidate reverses the process by allowing the rope hand over hand out, lowering the extended ladder back into the ready position.  If the Candidate steps outside of the box area while raising or lowering the extension ladder, the Proctor warns the Candidate.  This can only happen once within the evolution.  If the Candidate steps outside of the box area a second time the Candidate will fail this station.  The Candidate can not allow the lanyard to simply slip through their hands and allow the extension ladder to free fall back down. If this happens or the Candidate drops the fourteen foot ladder while raising or lowering it, the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached the end of the three minute period.  The Candidate will go to the next station.

8. Overhead Pike-pole Overhaul Press

Overhead Pike-pole Overhaul Simulation


Theory Behind the Overhead Pike-pole Overhaul Press:

 The Overhead Pike-pole Overhaul Press is designed to stimulate the Fire Candidate's heart and place the same stresses on the Candidate as if pushing and pulling ceiling during overhaul and fire extension check at an incident.  

How this station is Negotiated: 

The Candidate approaches the Pike-pole press continuing to wear the fifty pound weighted vest.  The Candidate steps onto the step block and grabs onto the pole.  The Candidate thrusts the pole up touching the very top of the press, then lowers down the press until the top of the weighted area exposes a marked line.  The Candidate will thrust the pole upward twenty-five times while the Proctor counts out loudly.  If the Candidate stops for more than three seconds, the Proctor warns the Candidate and adds five seconds to the Candidate's time each stop.  This can only happen twice within the evolution.  If the Proctor has to warn the Candidate a third time the Candidate fails this station.  The Proctor will yell out CLEAR once the Candidate has reached twenty-fifth lowering of the pole and the candidate steps off of the platform.  This will end the time for the Candidate and the FEAT will be complete.

Development in the Department



Sitting around

The Days of Ol' where the Firefighters sat around in their favorite chair telling old war stories of the last fire and waiting for the next "Big One" are gone!

The Fire Service today has made great strides in becoming more safe, more professional, and has progressed massively in technological advances.  These advances are due greatly to Firefighters looking at the way it used to be done and easier, safer ways to get things done.  This is considered Development within the Fire Service and it is constantly changing for the better.  For a Fire and Rescue Department to survive and strive within the Fire Service the Department must keep up to date with the latest technologies.  The role of the Development Division in the Fire Department is to search, research, test advanced technology, and even develop new and safer ways to keep the Public and Firefighters safe.  
Development Research

Interest in the Program



If you are interested in becoming a Firefighter at Kinston Fire & Rescue, or if you know of a person that would like to participate within the program click on the Interested tab below and fill out the On-Line Fill-able Form and the Department Representative will get into contact with you to assist in scheduling for you come to the Fire Station and speak with you on becoming a Firefighter.  

If you or a person you know are interested in participating in the Ride-Along Program click on the Interested tab below and
fill out the On-line Fill-able form and the Department Representative will get into contact with you to assist in scheduling for you to come and participate in the Kinston Fire and Rescue Ride-Along Program.
  

Or if you are requesting a specific service you wish to have provided to you such as needing a State Certification Training that may be offered through the Lenoir Community College that is being taught at the Kinston Department of Fire and Rescue, click on the Interested tab below and follow the instructions to register through Lenoir Community College.
  1. Interest in Employment
  2. Ride-Along Program
  3. North Carolina Cert Training